In Conversation with: Enock Matambure

In Conversation with: Enock Matambure

Meet prolific photographer and student, Enocq Mat as he takes us through his journey as a photographer.

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Where did your passion for photography come from?

It all started when I got my first camera after I had graduated from high school, and from that time photography has been my everyday life. My passion comes from the physical world around me, humanity & society: from the principal things to the most insignificant. The desire being to immerse myself in the beauty of what I see with my own eyes through the lense and capturing a precious moment in time, by portraying the subjects in different.

What would you say sets you apart from other photographers out there?

By taking ideas from experts and mixing them with my personal flair I produce something unique and hence creating a signature of my own. But the kicker is that I’m particularly inspired by the everyday, telling stories of the everyday life of people, particularly the social aspect of it. For me, photography is not just about people and their experiences. I find a strong connection with the world as I can take pictures of it. I take photos because I enjoy the creative process, I take photos because they help us connect to other people, and photography helps us build a sense of community.

Who inspires your work?

I am inspired by Steven Chikosi, one of the renowned photographers in Zimbabwe also rated in the top 5 best African Photographers Forum. I also love the way he tells stories through pictures, which I also take from. I am also inspired by Clement Museka who is one of the best “underground” photographers I know.

Where is your favourite place to take photos from?

The world is an all beautiful place, aesthetically speaking, so it will be difficult for me to choose one place, but in Zimbabwe, my favourite place to shoot is Vumba.

Of all the photographs, you have ever taken which one is your favourite?

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Meet these two gentlemen, Austin and David, caught up with them while I was traveling and they were on their way home from school. Something inside startled, that feeling of nostalgia filled me as I remembered my days in school as a kid. They did not look rich or appealing (could have been hungry ) but all these material possessions are temporary. What makes this picture stand out is the fact that I convinced myself that I was going to frame and take this image to them, (without money or price) because these activities don’t wear out, and they fill me with good memories through creating much deeper feelings of love and compassion.

 What is the most important thing you consider when taking a photograph?

Light, photography is light.

Who are your favourite photographers and why them?

Jake Olson, he has a unique way of both shooting and processing pictures. Then there is Vootography is one of the best photography critics I know. I also like Jason Lanier who taught me how to make money through photography. Then above all is my father he is a great tutor, couldn’t have got to where I am without his guidance.

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What is the one thing you can’t live without?

God the Almighty, in him I live, in him I move, in him I have my well-being.

Given the chance who in the world would you want to photograph?

Given the chance I would have a studio session with the President of Zimbabwe (funny as it sounds hahaha)

Where in the world would be your dream place to go, and take photos?

For a person who is adventurous like me, I will travel to the charming Isle of Skye. I’m fascinated by its rugged mountains which tower over the landscape like giants, and winding paths. The place is like a fantasy Island, a great place to relax, and do bird watching for over 240 species.

What are you most fond of about being Zimbabwean?

First, it’s because I was born in Zimbabwe and the inhabitants of this country are open minded people, they always find a solution out of every obstacle. Second it is because of our rich culture, and traditions. Third, because of the “peaceful atmosphere” that prevails in Zimbabwe it makes me feel at home and that makes me love my country with passion.

How can people get in touch with you or access your work?

I am soon to buy my domain, but I have a preliminary website that I created: enocqmatphotographie.weebly.com where I post my photography work every fortnight. I also have a Facebook page: Enocq Mat Photography.

Then there is an Instagram page: @enocqmatphotography  people can also access my work through twitter: @EnocqM

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